SPRING 2005


Coyote Hills Regional Park 04-09-05 POSTED
Long Ridge Open Space Preserve 04-16-05 POSTED
Sunol Regional Park 04-23-05 POSTED
Joseph D. Grant County Park and Twin Gates 04-30-05 POSTED
Mount Diablo State Park (Mitchell Canyon) 05-07-05 POSTED
Del Puerto Canyon and San Antonio Valley 05-14-05 POSTED
Pinnacles National Monument (West side) 05-21-05 POSTED

Note: The trip reports below are organized in reverse chronological order (more recent report first).




Pinnacles National Monument (West side) 05-21-05

It's been a year since our class visited this beautiful park. This time we toured the west side which features a higher and drier habitat than we found in the east. There are two trails that lead through good birding habitat, both fairly easy and rather short, so we begain by walking toward the Balcones Caves. We worked the grassy oak wooodland and adjoining sage brush and canyons before retreating and having lunch. A small creek nourishes the canyon floor creating a setting unlike anything we have enountered together. Enormous cliff walls rise hundreds of feet above us and we marched through the creek bed, among great boulders that form glowing orange tallus caves. In places the tiny creek is bordered by lush willows and brilliant wildflowers. It was perfectly sunny during our tour and got quite warm in the exposed areas, especially the near desert sage habitat. After our picnic we made a brief tour of the Juniper Canyon trail before dispanding. Birding was good, with only slightly fewer speices encountered this year. As suspected however, our mission did not include sightings of California Condor. The birds appear to prefer the eastern face of the cliffs, but we kept our eyes open just in case. Activity began as soon as we arrived in the parking area, with numerous White-throated Swifts, Ash-throated Flycatchers and Western Wood Pewees and Violet-green Swallows annnouncing their presence. Within moments, a strange song emminated from the shrubbery about ten yards from the restrooms. It was quite loud and varied, but its phrases were marked with a peculiar hesitation. Measured chatterings, squeeks, churrs and whistles recalled Mockingbird or Thrasher but of course it was neither. It was a Yellow-breasted Chat! We located the bird with only a little difficulty as it sang from the top of a bush, positively glowing in the sun. It moved a couple of times, each new perch a bit further away and more sheltered from the last, but still visible. The bird was a lifer for many members and only the second time our team has encountered it together. Other highlights included several Lazuli Buntings, two Lawrence's Goldfinches and of course many opportunities to identify Flycatchers. Warblers and Sparrows were scarce but we contented ourselves with beautiful scenery and a the opportunity to review a new location. Note to self: Resolve the group permit before future trips to the area.


Turkey Vulture
American Kestrel
Prairie Falcon
California Quail
Mourning Dove
White-throated Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Costa's Hummingbird
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Western Wood Pewee
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Violet-green Swallow
Barn Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
Common Raven
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Canyon Wren
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Western Bluebird
Wrentit
California Thrasher
Phainopepla
European Starling
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
Lawrence's Goldfinch





Del Puerto Canyon and San Antonio Valley 05-14-05

Every once in a while one of our field trips goes perfectly... The rings of brilliant weather, colorful birds, stunning scenery and our combined group enthusiasm align to create a circle so round and flawless that you just have to believe it was designed that way. Those who participated today will understand what I am trying to say. Today was just such a day!

We began differently than in years past, approaching from the east to hit Del Puerto Canyon in the morning. As Mr. Melnick observed, this allowed us the opportunity to observe this dry grassy habitat without the familiar heat shimmier of late afternoon. As a result yellow lores of Grasshopper Sparrow (MP 0.5) and the deep navy blue tones of Blue Grosbeak (first cattle guard) were clear to everyone in our group. The latter species was enjoyed as a pair, with female carrying nesting material from the nearby ditch into a hidden area up ridge beyond the barbed wire. Continuing in from the Patterson-side entrance we encountered numerous Western Kingbirds and a Prairie Falcon near where the huge powerlines appear on the left. A brief pullout where the creek runs beside a small barn on the right (MP 02.3 or so) we encountered our first Lark Sparrow, Bullock's Oriole and Yellow-billed Magpies, as well as Brown-headed Cowbird and more Western Kingbirds. We would see each of these several times more during the day. Just before Grafitti Rock (MP 03.7) we logged Yellow Warbler which was exciting enough, but when we rounded the corner and surveyed the Tree Tabacco we found one of our target birds, a glorious Costa's Hummingbird with a blazing boysenberry-colored gorget. He vocalized for us several times before dashing off, but reappeared after several moments allowing our group to admire him at length. His thin ascending-descending call was heard repeatedly.

About this time, Art Edwards and George Bing met up with us. Art and his friend have been birding this route for three decades and have created self-guided itineries for both Del Puerto Canyon and Mines Road (available in the Stanislaus section of Joe Morlan's County Birding page: http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~jmorlan/county.htm) These documents were crucial for the planning of this mission and it was so fortunate we we met them both. As well, the Audubon Society Stanislaus Chapter http://www.stanislausbirds.org/del_puerto_canyon.htm offers useful information and a great map of the area.

Anyway... at Owl Rock (MP 03.9) we managed to get our two Owl species for the day, Great Horned and Barn, each nestled deep in their respective nest caves. Lazuli Bunting was heard and seen here as well as a pair of Golden Eagles perched on the ridge. Say's Phoebe is primarily a winter visitor for much of our area, but remains along this road year round and we observed one along the fence line. We continued west, stopping only occasionally to look and listen. Green Heron was spotted in the Lewis' Woodpecker Flats area (MP 09.5) A brief stop where the creek runs beneath the road (MP 10.4?) produced good, but rushed looks at Rufous-crowned Sparrow and Canyon Wren, both of which sang for us.

Despite a lengthy search for the recently reported Yellow-breasted Chat in the riparian area .25 miles east of Frank Raines Park (MP 16.1) we could not locate the bird. We did however, have a picnic lunch and got good looks at Western Tanager and two flyover Phainopeplas. We stopped at a small pond about 1 mile west of the Stanislaus/Santa Clara County line and viewed a large number of Tricolored Blackbirds in the reeds. From there we passed through beautiful canyon habitat but decided not to stop until we reached the small pond before the Junction. Parking was difficult there but worthwhile. Western Wood Pewee, Violet-green Swallows, Purple Finch and Lewis' Woodpecker were all detected, but unfortunately, there were no hoped-for Wood Ducks.

At the Junction, we rested for a moment and drank cold water, it was 88F at this point and we were all quite tired... Lisa Meyers' group was here, having driven from Mount Hamilton so we exchanged reports before continuing on. A short drive south (about 1 mile) on San Antonio Valley Road where we viewed the dead trees did not produce any additonal Lewis' Woopecker, but a single singing Chipping Sparrow was heard on the west side of the fence. We doubled back and pulled into the fire station (a 100 yards north of the Junction) and searched for Lawrence's Goldfinch. After identifying Western Wood Pewee, Bullock's Orioles, House Finches and House Sparrows we began to hear the busy buzzy song of our Goldfinch. With difficulty, we finally got great looks at them as they flitted around the long-needle pine trees overhead. Their song contained so many rapid-fire immitations of other species it was hard to follow, but their characteristic "glassy" ringing call provided some kind of handle for us to hold onto.

Some members left a this point and the tour was essentially complete, however a few joined me at the sage covered hillside near the cattle guard north of the firestation to search for Sage Sparrow. None were heard or seen (likely it was just too late in the day...) but Blue-gray Gnatcatcher was located. Our three-car caravan also spotted a female Wood Duck in a shallow creek that runs on the west side of the road near a corral (I'm afraid I have no recollection which MP this was...). She had a few chicks with her, which she quietly deposited in a hiding place before she flew off. Finally, as we neared the intersection with Del Valle Road (MP 05.5?) we saw a Greater Roadrunner crossing the road and disappearing upslope. It was a wonderful day, but exhausting and my apologies for the sloppy mile post references. I think next spring's tour of this area will likely be from the Patterson entrance, but eventually we will need to begin our morning at the junction to increase our chances of finding the elusive Sage Sparrow.


Pied-billed Grebe
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Wood Duck
Mallard
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
American Kestrel
Prairie Falcon
California Quail
American Coot
Killdeer
Greater Yellowlegs
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Greater Roadrunner
Barn Owl
Great Horned Owl
Anna's Hummingbird
Costa's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Lewis' Woodpecker
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Western Wood Pewee
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Loggerhead Shrike
Western Scrub Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Oak Titmouse
White-breasted Nuthatch
Rock Wren
Canyon Wren
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Phainopepla
Yellow Warbler
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Black-headed Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Tricolored Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
American Goldfinch
Lawrence's Goldfinch
House Sparrow






Mount Diablo State Park (Mitchell Canyon) 05-07-05

This was our first group tour of this east bay spot. Traditionally, the Mitchell Canyon section provides the most productive birding in the Mount Diablo State Park and all evidence seems to suggest spring is the best time to visit. Today's discoveries certainly can attest to that! Although our species count may not have been extraordinary, the combination of sights and sounds was exceptional and several uncommon birds were logged. Early overcast conditions however, delayed the colorful migrant activity until mid morning when the sun warmed the riparian woodland and the singing began. Flycatchers made an early appearance, with Olive-sided Flycatcher perching within sight of the parking area. That species was seen and heard repeatedly, quite conveniently always atop the text-book described tallest dead snag. As we climbed the first hill, the hoarse call of the Western Wood Pewee was heard below the trail in a stand of trees. Sure enough, we spotted it on a conspicuous perch, somewhat lower in the tree than the Olive-sided might choose. Pacific-slope Flycatcher was encountered later in the dense riparian willow section of the trail, predictably it confined itself to the lower sections of the canopy and allowed itself to see direct sunlight only occasionally. It took some time for us to locate Ash-throated visually, although they were heard along the creek on many occasions. When it finally showed itself, it was some distance from the creek along the edges of the wood. Isn't it nice when real-life encounters match so closely what the fieldguides describe...? Warbler sightings were exciting and numerous with obvious highlights being the uncommon migrant Hermit Warbler and MacGillivray's Warbler. Vireos as well, were well seen, with the bespeckled Cassin's being most people's favorite. Black-headed Grosbeak and Lazuli Bunting were nearly constant companions along the trail but very few females were detected. Perhaps it was because of their lack of song and increased nesting responsibilities they were difficult to spot. In all our encounters with Passerines, song was an important method of identification, and as I mentioned last week, everyone is making obvious strides toward vocal-ID confidence. With a little more work, trips like today's should be even more rewarding. Conspicuous no-shows were any Sparrows beyond Dark-eyed Junco. Possible heard-only identifications include Black-throated Gray Warbler, Nashville Warbler and Rufous-crowned Sparrow. None of these uncommon species was heard well enough to make the final list, but needed to be mentioned. As well, it should be noted that two mysterious Empidonax Flycatchers were seen. One showing tendencies toward Willow, the other toward Hammond's. Note to self: check the schedule for equestrian endurance races in the future...

Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
California Quail
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
White-throated Swift
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Western Wood Pewee
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Violet-green Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Swainson's Thrush
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
California Thrasher
European Starling
Cassin's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Hermit Warbler
MacGillivray's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
Lesser Goldfinch




Joseph D. Grant County Park and Twin Gates 04-30-05

Glorious weather! Luminous birds! You could hardly ask for a more perfect situation... As usual, we began near the farmhouse, looking and listening for evidence of spring along the riparian corridor. Then we made a brief stop at the lake and finally caravanned up to Twin Gates. Nearly the full spectrum of avian color was seen with numerous spikes of neon intensity occuring in the yellow-orange and cyan wavelengths. It's been way too long since we've encountered Lazuli Bunting at Grant Park and today seemed to make up for all those other trips. No less than four individuals were seen well by everyone, along with several other birds that may have been duplicates. Many birds are beautiful of course, but few exceed this one's sheer chromatic shock value. Simply glorious! The entire day, which included three separate stops, we paid attention to sound, especially those of the recently discussed Flycatchers. We were successful in locating five of the six targeted Flycatchers; with only the Olive-sided eluding us. Perhaps next spring, the park service will resolve the Smith Creek issue so we can visit it again.

Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Canada Goose
Mallard
Cinnamon Teal
Bufflehead
Ruddy Duck
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk (heard only)
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Wild Turkey
California Quail
American Coot
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Western Wood Pewee
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (heard only)
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Western Scrub Jay
Steller's Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
Common Raven
American Crow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird (Mt. Hamilton Road)
California Thrasher
Cedar Waxwing (Mt. Hamilton Road)
European Starling
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Rufous-crowned Sparrow (Mt. Hamilton Road)
Lark Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark (heard only)
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Pine Siskin (heard only)
Lesser Goldfinch
American Goldfinch


Sunol Regional Wilderness 04-23-05

This was our first group outing to this wonderful East Bay riparian woodland. The forecast was dismal, but a few brave souls took their chances and showed up to help out with the effort. Surprisingly, with the exception of a sprinkle here and there, the heavy rains never materialized and birding was quite pleasant even if a bit cool and overcast. This lush spring destination has figured prominantly in the EBB listserv of late because of a rare Harris' Sparrow that has continued since February. It had been reported as recently as Thursday so was quite an incentive for a visit! Knowing that the weather could change at any moment we put an immediate effort into locating this prized species. We broke up into two teams to surround the area near the outhouses by the first lot. One group walked slowly beside the cars. The other quietly watched the dirt road leading down to the water. A few members remained on the edge to signal the walkers if the bird should appear. After a few minutes of nothing, a handfull of Zonotrichias began to show up along the edges of the underbrush along the trail, mainly Golden-crowns, but also a single White-crown and a comparitively huge California Towhee. It wasn't long before a very different bird, with a whitish belly, black spotted breast and face appeared. This was our bird! It foraged comfortably for several minutes quite out in the open, giving us ample time to review all the necessary fieldmarks to positively identify it. We admired it for a while and then, with great restraint, cheered at low-volume. As far as I was concerned the mission was a total success by 0-830 hours, but the weather was holding so we continued on. A relaxed walk across the brige and along the opposite bank produced many additional birds, colorful spring migrants and several examples of nesting behavior. Western Tanager, Black-headed Grosbeak, Bullock's Oriole, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, House Wren, Cassin's Vireo, White-breasted Nuthatch and Ash-throated Flycatcher were among the favorites. Unfortunately, a few birds from the previous week's scouting trip were missed such as Black-throated Gray Warbler, but on the other hand, several more were gained. I think the recent emphasis on bird song has had a beneficial effect on our field results, and our group's collective audidory skills have become so strong that I foresee a time when we may need to do a blindfolded walk to keep people challenged... preferably in a nice flat area. We will definitely visit this area again next spring.


Green Heron
Mallard
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel (probable)
Prairie Falcon (possible)
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Rock Pigeon
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
White-throated Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Rufous Hummingbird
Allen's Hummingbird
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (heard only)
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
American Robin
European Starling
Cassin's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo (heard only)
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow Warbler (heard only)
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend's Warbler (heard only)
MacGillivray's Warbler (heard only)
Wilson's Warbler (heard only)
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Harris' Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Bullock's Oriole
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch





Long Ridge Open Space Preserve 04-16-05

The scenery at Long Ridge OSP is stunning any time of year and this day was no exception. It was clear and relatively warm from the start and became only more beautiful as the noon hour approached. Wildflowers, including California Poppy, Forget-me-not and Shooting Star were seen many times, the ridge view was bright and expansive and the shadowy green forest was nothing short of magical in places. Despite the overwhelming beauty around us however, the viewing challenges of the preserve remained quite undiminished. While no one really wants to log a colorful Warbler by sound alone, the closed habitat required often that we do just that. Welcome to the world of sound! In this habitat, an awareness of sound can mean the difference between a productive walk and a waste of good birding time... We chose to make it productive. As we walked, a three dimensional audio landscape opened before us and we felt our way through it, almost blindly, working hard to recognize what we could. Gradually the forest made its occupants known to our silent group, it's many voices sometimes overlapping confusingly. Everything from the trilled songs of Dark-eyed Juncos, Orange-crowned and Wilson's Warblers to the up-and-down songs of Western Tanager, Warbling Vireo and Black-headed Grosbeak, and the high thin, buzzy songs of Black-throated Gray and Townsend's Warblers were presented to us. We did our best to listen and identify. Oh, how the human ear desires to know the forest voice.


Mallard
Turkey Vulture
Accipiter species
Red-tailed Hawk
Anna's Hummingbird
Acorn Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Willow Flycatcher
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
Common Raven
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Bewick's Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Wrentit
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin







Coyote Hills Regional Park 04-09-05

This was our first outing of the spring term and expectations were high for some colorful Passerine activity. The rain earlier in the week and during the early this morning meant that birds would probably be active and vocal, and indeed we were not disappointed. Since bird sounds were everywhere, we all worked very hard to identify as many vocalizations as possible and all attendees got at least one bird by voice. Several members were even able to manage quite a few of voice-only IDs, including indentifying some of the many migrant species. So congratulations to everyone! Well done.

We began as usual in the last parking lot near the large pond and interpretive center. The willows by the water were active with several singing Warblers including Yellow-rumped, Wilson's and a cooperative Black-throated Gray, this last species has been seen very rarely on our previous group trips so this was quite a welcome discovery. We also got brief looks at a Gray Fox as it crept through the underbrush. From here we meandered throught the trees and tables in the picnic area to locate additional Yellow-rumps (of both subspecies) and at least two more singing Wilson's Warblers. A lone Townsend's Warbler was heard near the garden, but never viewed. Allen's Hummingbirds and American Goldfinches added brilliant color to the area and all were well viewed. As we hiked up to Hoot Hollow we observed increasing numbers of Swallows, mainly Violet-green with a few Tree, Cliff and Barn thrown in. Northern Rough-winged Swallow was also picked out of the group along with several White-throated Swifts. It was in this area also we encountered our first Pacific-slope Flycatcher and a family of House Wrens. Up and over the hill we hiked toward another freshwater pond and the salt ponds along the bay. Orange-crowned Warbler was heard as we passed through the drier chaparral areas and Common Yellowthroat showed up in the reedy edges. Waterfowl species were seen in both freshwater areas and included lingering American Wigeon as well as Northern Pintail, Gadwall, Cinnamon and Green-winged Teal, and Northern Shoveler. When we finally reached the bay we saw a single American Pipit and a handful of Least Sandpiper. Distant pale-mantled Gulls were not identified, but may have included Ring-billed, California and Herring. We returned to the freshwater pond and hiked up the hill overlooking the marsh, although some members chose to take the level marsh trail along the road and may have seen other birs our group did not). Our only encounter with Yellow Warbler of the day was a heard-only identification on the ridge trail, but it was still solid. All in all it was a beautiful day with mild weather and some great spring birds. Still more color to come, I'm sure, in the upcoming trips, but little can surpass those Orioles as far as brilliance!

Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Eared Grebe
American White Pelican
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Canada Goose
Green-winged Teal
Mallard
Northern Pintail
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Greater Scaup
Ruddy Duck
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
California Quail
Common Moorhen (heard only)
American Coot
Killdeer
American Avocet
Black-necked Stilt
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Least Sandpiper
Gull species
Forster's Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
White-throated Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Allen's Hummingbird
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Bushtit
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Marsh Wren
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
American Pipit
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow Warbler (heard only)
Yellow-rumped Warbler ("Audubon's" and "Myrtle")
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Townsend's Warbler (heard only)
Common Yellowthroat
Wilson's Warbler
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Brewer's Blackbird
Bullock's Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch