SPRING 2009


Alum Rock Park 04-04-09 POSTED
Gilroy Hot Springs 04-11-09 POSTED
SCVAS Birdathon 04-18-09 POSTED
Sunol Regional Wilderness 04-25-09 POSTED
Mitchell Canyon 05-09-09 POSTED
Fremont Peak 05-16-09 POSTED
Del Puerto Canyon / Mines Road 05-23-09 POSTED
Cosumnes River Preserve 05-30-09 POSTED

Note: The trip reports below are organized in reverse chronological order (more recent report first).



Cosumnes River Preserve 05-30-09

Temperatures were considerably lower today than they had been earlier in the week. There was some morning cloud cover making for a chilly for the first hour. After that, the sun came out, burned the clouds and it warmed enough to remove a few layers. More significant to our species count for the day however, was a steady breeze up to 15 or 20 mph at times, and a surprise trail closure due to railroad workers clearing vegetation in the preserve.

Everyone transferred the food for the potluck to Kaz and Aiko's car, after which Kelly and her mom went home to prepare the buffet. Kaz remained with the group until he had leave for barbecue duties. Anyway, birding got off to an amazing start with Eric spotting the first of several Blue Grosbeaks in a thicket across the marsh. Most everyone got a look at the beautiful blue male bird, but it quickly dropped out of site. Overhead we had primarily Cliff and Tree Swallows but in the distance a dark, long-winged Raptor proved to be a Swainson's Hawk. Within minutes of starting our walk, we had logged two of our three targets for the day.

As we paralleled the entrance road, we kept a watch out for marsh species. Northern Harrier and American Bittern were found flying over the reeds a few hundred yards away, but American Avocet was also found. A small reedy pond produced a lone Green Heron and several Red-winged Blackbirds. While we were discussing the issues of safely differentiating the interior "three-colored" Red-winged Blackbird, we had a small flock of authentic Tricolored Blackbirds fly through for easy and immediate comparison. I'd like to say I planned it that way...

Heading onto the River Walk we stopped to admire a small group of young Wood Ducks. The tricky task of identifying fledgling Ducks was made even more difficult by the absence of an adult. Head patterns are distinctive, but the only adult Ducks we saw at first were a Gadwall and a Mallard. I felt a little shaky on calling them Wood Ducks, but a moment later an adult male became visible... Ah, what relief.

Continuing along the trail we continued to see Swainson's Hawks high overhead. Dark phase, light phase and immatures made for a very fulfilling term-first encounter with the species. We also heard and saw Bushtit, Oak Titmouse, House Wren, White-breasted Nuthatch, Lesser and American Goldfinches in this area, but not a single Warbler. It wasn't until we reached the marsh that we found Common Yellowthroat, which was a little surprising. I fully expected to find Yellow Warbler on this trip.


Photos (combined): Ashutosh Sinha

The marsh was covered in a red plant of some kind, making it look like solid ground. In the center was a Pied-billed Grebe sitting on a nest with young. The area was otherwise dominated by swirling Tree Swallows, Red-winged Blackbirds and Marsh Wrens. Nuttall's and Downy Woodpecker made brief appearances, and of course, more Swainson's Hawks. We were beginning to get better looks at Ash-throated Flycatchers by now, a species we had heard all morning, and while we checked each Kingbird we came across they were all Westerns. WE watched a Northern Flicker chick as it poked its head out of a surprisingly large nest hole. It's so exciting to see young birds this time of years. They lack many of the markings of adults and it can often be difficult to identify them. This bird however, was no problem.

We turned onto the pedestrian bridge leading back to the visitors' center. We sat for a few moments as everyone used the facilities and both male and female Black-chinned Hummingbirds visited the deck. They moved in and out quickly, but we got them on the list anyway. Anna's was also present, and a House Wren attending young right next to the picnic benches.

We returned to the main River Walk Trail, but had to turn around too quickly because of the workers I mentioned earlier. We did manage to add a term species however as a flock of White-faced Ibis flew past our turnaround. Eric spotted a single Glossy among them, but we're waiting for his final documentation... (we have high hopes, Eric!).

Ken Lillis who was toward the back of the line reported seeing a male Blue Grosbeak back at the marsh, so it seemed prudent to see if we could relocate it. Some people had not gotten satisfactory looks earlier. Sure enough, after a brief playback, a male moved in to investigate. Before long we also had a female perched beside him. Before we were done we'd all gotten wonderful looks at this uncommon bird, one of my favorite spring birds.



Photo: Ashutosh Sinha

It was hard to top that of course, but we tried. Another brief stop at the visitors center produced additional looks at Black-chinned Hummingbirds, albeit brief. And a short hike to the boat launch brought us within view of several American Crows mobbing a Great Horned Owl.

We ended our visit to the preserve and took a short detour along Desmond Road. American Coot, Canada Goose, Cinnamon Teal, Northern Shoveler were added to the list as a result. All Kingbirds remained Westerns. Maybe next time we'll find a Cassin's among them. We watched as one Kingbird joined a Red-winged Blackbird in a cooperative mob session with an American Crow. Very exciting.

Finally, we reported to Kaz and Aiko's for our celebratory Mediterranean potluck. Everyone contributed to the fantastic wrap up meal. Grilled lamb, falafel, dolmas, hummus, vegetables, pita break, olives, lavash, feta and mozzarella cheese and basil. Cakes, cookies, wine and lemonade... It was such a lovely event. We sat at the large tables and watched a Black-chinned Hummingbird visit the backyard feeders, and an American Robin female feed four hungry chicks just a few feet away. It was a lovely way to end the final trip of the term, and to celebrate the 10th year of the class (roughly 240 field trips!). Thank you everyone for being a part of Kelly's and my life. The collective interest in birds and nature, the many contributions to the class meetings and Saturday walks you all make, the dedication, warmth and generosity of the entire group, and the deep friendship we share with each other are all so overwhelming. I am grateful for everything you bring to this great relationship and look forward to another decade (or two or three) with you.

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
Pied-billed Grebe
American White Pelican
American Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
White-faced Ibis
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Northern Harrier
Red-shouldered Hawk
Swainson's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Ring-necked Pheasant
American Coot
Killdeer
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Great Horned Owl
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Anna's Hummingbird
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Norther Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Marsh Wren
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Common Yellowthroat
Black-headed Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Spotted Towhee
Song Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Tricolored Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow






Mines Road / Del Puerto Canyon 05-23-09

We took the famous Mines Road / Del Puerto Canyon tour today. It has long been a spring destination for bay area birders seeking several uncommon local specialties. For the past several years we had begun on the I-5 end of the trail. In the absence of late afternoon heat shimmer, this path had resulted in improved looks at both Grasshopper Sparrow and Blue Grosbeak.  Because of the recent orchard plantings outside of Patterson however,  and my suspicion these two targets had been pushed out of the area, I decided to reverse the course and return to the way we originally done it, starting at Murrietta's Well outside of Livermore. The reversal of the route was a refreshing change, but may not have improved our results. We may want to return to the Patterson start, but we'll wait until next year to make that decision and see how the area around the orchard develops.  

Weather was cool and overcast for our rendez vous at Murrietta's Well. There was also a slight breeze but quickly we began to tick off a few birds on our list. Before most of the group had arrived a Peregrine Falcon flew over the vineyard, but everyone saw a breeding pair of Red-tailed Hawks being harassed by a pair of American Kestrels. White-tailed Kites hovered over the nearby fields and Red-shouldered Hawks were heard and seen along the creek. A great find was a group of "branchlings" or recently fledged Great Horned Owl and a nearby parent. Eurasian Collared Doves were found near the farmhouse, and several birds were heard but not seen, including Wilson's and Yellow Warblers. Western Kingbird, Black-headed Grosbeak, Bullock's Oriole and Western Tanager were all located as well, rounding out our expected species for this stop.



Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller

We headed up the road to the usual bridge stop just past the Del Valle junction. There we hoped to find Phainopepla, and sure enough, the call eventually came out from our group that a black bird with a crest was perched on an oak on the hillside. Before we knew it, we'd seen as many as five different Phainopelas, most of which appeared to be males. We also logged Western Kingbird and several fly-through Lawrence's Goldfinches. They never perched for us, but those of us who were able to track them in flight got good looks. Our Swallow section was filling out at this point with the addition of Cliff and Northern Rough-winged Swallows. Unlike previous years we did not find Willow Flycatcher, but we sure kept our eyes open.

As we made our way along the familiar trail, we stopped several times in places that looked like especially good habitat. A steep canyon with patchy chaparral produced the expected Rufous-crowned Sparrow, but also yielded a single Say's Phoebe (unexpected here, but not surprising in areas we would work later in the day). About this time we found our first Golden Eagle as well, right where we'd left it... No Lazuli Buntings though.

Unlike previous years on this trail, even before the change in direction, we had a focused mission to find a certain species--Black-chinned Sparrow. In an effort to reach the summit we raced past many sections that could have produced a few new birds for the day. But the dense chaparral slopes called to us with the possibility of a certain highly prized class-first species. Well, we gave it our best. We held our breath, refrained from cracking gravel under our feet, avoided zipping zipper, kept very still and  fell absolutely silent. We listened. Nothing. When the moment was right we played the accelerating song of our target bird. Still nothing. (I should point out that I had heard and seen the bird at this location on previous occasions, even late in the day.) But alas, it was not meant to be for our group today. We did however, find California Thrasher and a very cooperative pair of Blue-gray Gnatcatchers in the coyote push, plenty eager to get our attention. After a decade of leading field trips.... we have yet to find this nearly mythic Spizella, but I promise. Some day we will.

After passing through several areas of gray pine and equally nice chaparral slopes, we descended into the valley. A brief stop at one patch produced our best looks at "Bell's" Sage Sparrow for the day. A singing male was perched quite high in a tree, and a second bird flew upslope and disappeared. Before the end of the day we would add two more at that traditional cattle grate. Not bad at all. Who needs a Black-chinned anyway..? 

Lawrence's Goldfinches were surprisingly difficult to find today. In no small part due to the closure of the old fire station. Still, we had them in a few places along our route, but never got the famous looks of previous years. Lewis's Woodpeckers were also seen twice before we arrived in the usual oak savannah valley south of the Junction with Del Puerto Canyon Road. We ended up seeing at least 5 individual birds, including one that appeared to be attending a nest. As we often do, we noticed the species fly catching behavior, unique among Woodpeckers.

The first pond on Del Puerto Canyon Road was drained for the most part and having decided NOT to have lunch with the 100 other visitors to the Junction, mostly bikers and cyclists, we kept going until we reached the second pond. There we found both Red-winged Blackbirds and our target Tricolored Blackbirds. As always, the different calls were helpful in distinguishing the similar species, as were their respective nesting behavior. The Tricolored form much denser colonies and were segregated from the Red-wings. Also present here were our only Waterbirds of the day, Pied-billed Grebe and American Coot, both attending young.

Eventually, we found a good place to pull off for lunch. A large gravel area within a canyon put us right below a singing Rock Wren. We didn't find shade here, but a slight breeze kept us cool. Watermelon never tasted so good! Just before we left, we found a female Phainopepla in a small bush near our group.

We continued the long descent into the area near Frank Rains campground a picnic areas. Lawrence's Goldfinches again, but still not the looks we desired. Nice consolations were Green Heron and Belted Kingfisher, both new for the day. I began to wonder why we hadn't yet found Olive-sided Flycatcher or Western Wood Pewee when sure enough a drab Contopus sordidulus called from a tree along the stream.

The next big stop was our traditional Canyon Wren stop. A wide turn and a lovely riparian grove are almost always productive. We found at least two Rufous-crowned Sparrows on the hillside above the road, and with some effort we pulled out a calling Canyon Wren. We never did see this bird, but its metallic call is unmistakable. Just before we left a Prairie Falcon appeared over the ridge, dark axillaries and all.



Photo: Brooke Miller

At Owl Canyon we hoped to find a few more species, especially a certain Calypte Hummingbird. A young Great Horned Owl was roosting in a cave, White-throated Swifts were diving in and out of smaller crevices and a lone Hummingbird, an Anna's, buzzed through. We did not find our target Costa's Hummingbird despite a dedicated search, but we later learned one car that passed through the area earlier, had succeeded. Oh, well... next time.


 
Photo: Brooke Miller

By now, fatigue was beginning to set in. We stopped at Graffiti Rock, again no Costa's. And after that we stopped at a cattle ground along a grassy straightaway. We watched as an American Crow attempted to predate a Bullock's Oriole nest, but we also found a pair of Loggerhead Shrike at a nest. Killdeer were giving their twittering call as they watched their nearby (invisible) nest.

As expected, the new orchards outside of Patterson have created a landscape unsuitable for two of our target species. There is little or no grass for our Ammodramus and no willow thickets for the Passerina. It will be interesting to see how this portion of the trail develops. Good or bad for our two particular hoped-for species, the terrain has changed. Will it attract new species in the future, creating a new group of target birds for our next trip? Only time will tell... 

Mallard
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
American Kestrel
Peregrine Falcon
Prairie Falcon
Common Moorhen
American Coot
Killdeer
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Eurasian Collared Dove
Great Horned Owl
White-throated Swifts
Anna's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Lewis's Woodpecker
Acorn Woodpecker
Sphyrapicus species
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Western Wood Pewee
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Loggerhead Shrike
Hutton's Vireo
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Rock Wren
Canyon Wren
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
California Thrasher
European Starling
Phainopepla
Orange-crowned Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Sage Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Black-headed Grosbeak
Red-winged Blackbird
Tricolored Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lawrrence's Goldfinch
Lesser Goldfinch





Femont Peak 05-16-09

We visted Fremont Peak in San Benito County today. Highlights began almost immediately when we were on the road leading up. As we passed through the first large patch of chaparral, several "Bell's" Sage Sparrows were highly vocal and easily seen along the road. We also encountered Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, and California Thrashers in various places on the way up.



Photo: Rob Pavey

At the park proper we had 2 Black-throated Gray, 3 Wilson's Warblers, at least three Hermit Warblers (two females, one male), many Orange-crowned and Townsend's Warblers. Lazuli Buntings were easily seen in the open areas near the peak, and we counted three pairs of Rock Wrens here as well, and the first of three Golden Eagles of the day. A single Nashville Warbler was found on the wooded trail leading back to the main parking area from the peak. One Hammond's Flycatcher, several Cassin's Vireos were also found in this area. Olive-sided Flycatchers, Western Wood Pewees, Western Tanagers and Black-headed Grosbeaks were positively un-missable. A real surprise was a Red-breasted Sapsucker in the upper picnic area near the main lot.



Photo: Rob Pavey

On our way downhill from the park we stopped again to listen for any unusual Sparrows on the slopes. At this point little was heard on the hillside, but in the riparian area one mile south of Hwy 156 we heard a Yellow-breasted Chat singing loudly from the willows. Also present here were several Eurasian Collared Dove and two Yellow Warblers. A nice heard-only species here was a Canyon Wren on the hillside above the road.

California Quail
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
American Kestrel
Rock Pigeon
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Eurasian Collared Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Selasphorus species
Acorn Woodpecker
Red-breasted Sapsucker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Western Wood Pewee
Hammond's Flycatcher
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Cassin's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Violet-green Swallow
Barn Swallow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Rock Wren
Canyon Wren
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
Swainson's Thrush
American Robin
Wrentit
California Thrasher
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Hermit Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Sage Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch





Mitchell Canyon 05-09-09

I always look forward to this trip because of the combination of plant communities found here. Mitchell Canyon is a springtime birding highlight with more than a few uncommon migrants and breeders found each year. The main trail leading up the canyon, passes through sycamore, oak, and dense willow habitat on its way to drier more gray pine and chaparral hillsides. Today was sunny and warm with a light breeze, but the park was filled with birds' song and more than a few of my favorite birds.

On first arriving, we found Wild Turkeys displaying in the lower lot, and over the grassy meadow White-throated Swifts, Northern Rough-winged and Violet-greens Swallows foraged for insects. Red-winged Blackbirds and Brewer's Blackbirds were displaying in the taller grass sections, while Western Meadowlark and Brown-headed Cowbirds, and nearby Bullock's Oriole completed the Icterid collection.

The parking lot had a large number of Lesser Goldfinches singing from nearly every tree. Males were clearly trying to attract the nearby females and engaged in a fluttery display and vocalizing on the wing. Among their many imitative calls, we could hear their best renditions of birds found in the canyon, including Western Wood Pewee, Bullock's Oriole and Black-headed Grosbeak. With the exception of the Wood Pewee, we eventually viewed the actual birds, and confirmed their presence. The Wood Pewee, well. Let's just say the Lesser Goldfinches are good, but not perfect. The real Pewee was calling farther up trail.

Heading up we got good looks at the first of several Olive-sided Flycatchers, Western Kingbirds and Ash-throated Flycatchers. Northern Mockingbird was singing from somewhere beyond our view and the White-throated Swifts, Violet-green, Northern Rough-winged, Barn and one or two Cliff Swallows were spotted overhead. We also detected Orange-crowned Warbler and Warbling Vireo in this first stretch of oak/sycamore. Of course, we were also finding the familiar Oak Titmouse, Bushtit and Bewick's Wren. Much farther up the trail we also found Chestnut-backed Chickadee. Despite a nearly silent vigil in areas where MacGillivray's Warblers had been located in the past, we were unable to repeat that event. There was also no Yellow-breasted Chat, or Nashville Warbler. But...

As our group reached the Red Road trailhead, the first of an eventual 10-for-the-day (I think this might be conservative) Hermit Warblers appeared in an oak slightly uphill. It was a beautiful male, and easily my favorite local Warbler. By the end of our walk, it became almost comical how routine the species seemed. We saw both males and females, birds that seemed slightly younger than full adults and in each case, we noticed the pure white undersides and nearly complete lack of streaking on the flanks. I looked to see if any resembled the hybrids that occasionally show up, but they all seemed quite pure. Townsend's was also present, but it's funny how the Hermit stole the show. Quite possibly, we could go another year before encountering this species, let alone this many, on a class field trip.


Photo: Rob Pavey

We continued along the Globe Lily trail where wildflowers were abundant. The only Hummingbird we came across was Anna's and a single Selasphorus species which appeared very rufous. A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher pair was working a shady area downhill from the trail. Below us we heard the jubilant song of Black-headed Grosbeak and finally got good looks at one when we rejoined the main trail. Northern Flicker and Olive-sided Flycatcher made for an odd treetop couple, and Lazuli Bunting became more common as we followed the main trail beside the creek.

Eventually we reached the dry rocky hillside where it would be logical to expect Rufous-crowned Sparrow. There were none today, but two Western Tanagers sang in the trees above the trail and quickly revealed themselves. Overhead an adult Bald Eagle soared. A short walk from here brought us to our turn-around place, and wouldn't you know, three more Hermit Warblers...

We ate lunch in the shade of the sycamore trees beside the lot. After a long, hot walk through the canyon, it was time to go home. Once again, Mitchell Canyon proved wonderful!

Mallard
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Double-crested Cormorant
Turkey Vulture
Cooper's Hawk
Golden Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
White-throated Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Selasphorus species
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Western Wood Petwee
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Cassin's Kingbird
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthtch
Bewick's Wren
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
Swainson's Thrush
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Hermit Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Lazuli Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch





Sunol Regional Wilderness 04-25-09

This beautiful riparian location along the Alameda creek is frequently productive in spring, especially with some of the colorful neotripic migrant species arriving to breed. Today was no exception. The weather was partly cloudy and cooler than earlier in the week, but the sycamores were loud with songs.

As we stood on the footbridge I found it interesting that no Bullock's Orioles were present. Usually, they are un-missable here, but generally we visit the park later in the season. In any case, several Warblers were heard overhead in the canopy. Orange-crowned was the most numerous followed by at least 4-5 Nashville Warblers, an astonishing high-count for the species on class field trips. One or two Yellow Warblers were also detected, but not seen. Elsewhere on the trail we found Wilson's Warbler. Not surprisingly, very few Yellow-rumped Warblers were found. Hutton's, Warbling and Cassin's Vireos were found even before we reached the other end of the bridge, and would be heard throughout the day.


Photo: Rob Pavey

Flycatchers were also well represented with Western Wood Pewee and Olive-sided Flycatchers found side by side in a single tree on a higher trail. The Olive-sided captured a Hummingbird-sized moth, perhaps a Sphinx, as we watched with something between amazement and queasiness. Ash-throated Flycatchers were seen once or twice along the edges of the trail, calling repeatedly and undoubtedly nesting nearby. Pacific-slope Flycatcher was also found, but only briefly seen as it flew through the understory, luckily it was pretty vocal. Of course, Black Phoebes were found as well, and later in the day, when we saw Western Kingbird on Calaveras Road, we completed our Flycatcher collection.

Western Tanager and Black-headed Grosbeak were found fairly quickly, but not as numerous as expected, again, somewhat puzzling. Yet another Nashville Warbler was found in the shadowy oak section, they were beginning to like old news... The level section of the trail, where House Wrens were actively nesting, yielded a couple of surprises, a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher called wheezily from a large oak, and appeared briefly as it flew across the trail. Nearby there was also a Lincoln's Sparrow that posed nicely for a moment. That bird will probably move on soon, as it breeds farther east and north, in higher ground. Among the many Violet-green Swallows were small numbers of Northern Rough-winged Swallows, but it wasn't until later we logged Barn, Tree and Cliff, the last two at Calaveras Reservoir. Also present overhead were a few Vaux's Swifts, their bat-like flight looking altogether different. Way above us, almost as if controlled by the clock, a Golden Eagle appeared right on time.

So far, it seemed as if we were having a good day. We'd even found a male Lazuli Bunting in the top of a tree. Electric, extraordinary blue! I was personally hoping we might add a skulking MacGillivray's Warbler to our list, but that was not meant to be. We kept exploring, thinking about what else might show up. After walking a few hundred yards west of the bridge, we came to a lovely open area where we have found Lazuli Bunting in years past. It was pretty quiet today, with little or no activity. As we were beginning to withdraw, some folks stayed behind. Soon, they called to us saying that Petersen had something yellow, maybe an Oriole or a Tanager low in a tree. We went back to investigate and the yellow bird partially blocked by foliage revealed itself to be a Yellow-breasted Chat! Wow! That wasn't something I expected to find today... Sadly, it was not terribly cooperative and not everyone got great looks, but it is a skulker, after all, and quite rare in our area. Add to that its wandering nature, and you have a pretty exciting bird for the day.

After lunch, we relocated our cars to the far end of the meadow and watched the Red-shouldered Hawk on its nest. Beyond the bridge we found a wide grassy habitat, well suited for Lazuli Bunting and Chipping Sparrows and sure enough, both species were present in numbers by the corral. No hoped-for Lawrence's Goldfinch was seen, but finally Bullock's Orioles. Continuing along the trail to our traditional stakeout for Rufous-crowned Sparrows was successful, and a suspicious female Selasphorus Hummingbird. Perhaps Allen's, maybe Rufous, but for now, un-specified. On our return, we found our only Zonotrichia Sparrows, both White-crowned and Golden-crowned in a tree. As we reached the corral again, Petersen, who had lagged behind gave us the bittersweet news he had seen a Lewis's Woodpecker flying across the gorge on the coniferous slopes above the trail... Oh, well.



Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Rob Pavey

As a finale to an already wonderful day, we caravanned home via Calaveras Reservoir. An adult Bald Eagle flew beside our cars, coming for a landing on a power tower near the nest. Its mate was on the nest at the time, and we heard the first bird vocalize. Unexpected was an immature, possibly a first year bird, flew over as well. We continued to add birds, Aechmophorus species, Canada Goose, Bufflehead, White-throated Swift, Yellow-billed Magpie, Red-winged Blackbird, Western Meadowlark, Cliff Swallow, and some Larids (most likely Ring-billed and California but just too darn far away to tell). Finally, before leaving the reservoir all together, we spotted Western Kingbird on the barbed wire beside the road.

Canada Goose
Mallard
Bufflehead
Common Merganser
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Aechmophorus species
American White Pelican
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle (Calaveras Reservoir)
Cooper's Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk (Calaveras Reservoir)
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
American Kestrel
Killdeer (Calaveras Reservoir)
Larus species

Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Vaux's Swift
White-throated Swift (Calaveras Reservoir)
Anna's Hummingbird
Selasphorus species
Lewis's Woodpecker (seen by one)
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Western Wood Pewee
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird (Calaveras Reservoir)
Loggerhead Shrike (Calaveras Road)
Cassin's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie (Calaveras Reservoir)
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow (Calaveras Reservoir)
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Wrentit
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warblere
Nashville Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird (Calaveras Reservoir)
Western Meadowlark (Calaveras Reservoir)
Brown-headed Cowbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch






SCVAS Birdathon with Team DeDUCKtions 04-18-09

Our group met at Krispi Kreme at Rengstorff and Hwy 101 at 5:00. Participating in the count was Carolyn Straub, Steven McHenry, Ashutosh Sinha, Rob Pavey, Eric Goodill, Leonie Batkin, Kelly "Cricket" Dodder and myself. We stuck to the itinerary from last year for the most part with small departures based on recent news and a few tips from other birders. I had done most of the route the day before, but as expected, results were different between the two days.


Photo: Ashutosh Sinha

Smith Creek:
We managed quite well here with Wood Duck, Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers, Varied Thrush, Western Tanager, three species of Vireo and Purple Finch. Northern Pygmy Owl and Winter Wren were not found.

Kincaid Road: Spectacular looks at Chipping Sparrow and Lark Sparrow, as well as our first Bullock's Oriole. Band-tailed Pigeons were roosting in the trees by the corral. Western Kingbirds would have to wait. Yellow-billed Magpie was found in the trees across the meadow.

Twin Gates: The first of many Western Kingbirds, as well as Tree Swallows. By now we were seeing Tree Swallows mixed in with the Violet-greens. Yesterday's heard Lazuli Bunting was not refound.

Chaparral turnout: This is our traditional spot for Rufous-crowned Sparrow, but it has been less productive recently. We got Wrentit here but little else. Yesterday's Hammond's Flycatcher was nowhere to be seen, nor was last year's great Warbler flock. We ended up stopping at another pullout and easily found a pair of Rufous-crowned Sparrows. A single Lazuli Bunting female appeared briefly on the fence above the road.

Grant Lake: Northern Rough-winged Swallow was added to our growing list of Swallows. Alto found was Belted Kinfisher, and a few Waterfowl. Golden Eagle and Red-shouldered Hawk were not found.

Grant Park farmouse and riparian strip: The White-throated Sparrow was quickly found in the shadows beneath the bridge that leads to the farmouse driveway. Ash-throated Flycatcher was in the orchard behind the farmhouse and the Golden Eagle appeared high over the central meadow.

Alum Rock Park: Hooded Oriole was seen in the palm trees above the entrance kiosk. The Western Screech Owl was easily found in the sycamore grove, but we could not locate the Great Horned Owl. Townsend's Warbler was foraging in the trees above the creek.

Sierra Road: At the summit we had Horned Lark, Savannah Sparrow and Rock Wren. American Pipits were not located. More Yellow-billed Magpies were found in various places along the road.

Calaveras Reservoir: Bald Eagle nest was admired for as long as we dared (about 4 minutes...). Present on the water were Ring-billed and California Gulls.

Ed Levin Park: Pacific-slope Flycatcher was heard along the entrance road. On the trail leading up to the sycamore grove we found Grasshopper Sparrow. We could also hear Rufous-crowned Sparrows but we did not see them. No unusual Goldfinches were located. Looking down on the lake we found two Caspian Terns. From the trail we heard the Varied Twitchers communicating on their radios (all the way from Alviso)! We bumped into the soon after that. Overhead we also had American White Pelicans.


Photo: Eric Goodill

Environmental Education Center (EEC): We got some of our first Shorebirds along the entrance road. Long-billed Dowitcher was foranging on the channel. On salt pond A16 we had a good collection of Gulls. Most exciting was Glaucous and Herring. In the native flower garden a sooty Fox Sparrow was foraging in the shadows.

State and Spreckles: Eurasian Collared Doves on the wires as well as calling Hooded Orioles in the palms.

Alviso Marina: No Rails were found in the marsh, but we did bump into the Wild Women Birders who gave us a good tip on California Thrasher that were apparently nesting near the Stevens Creek Reservoir boat ramp.

Sunnyvale Water Pollution Control Ponds (SWPCP): Green Heron and Black Crowned Night Heron along the channel. We could not locate Common Moorhen however. In the distance on salt pond A4 we scoped Clark's and Western Grebes and more Caspian Terns. No rails were detected in the reedbrake by the cement bench.

Shoreline Park entrance road: We made a quick venture in to search for yesterday's Cackling Goose. No Goose.

Charleston Slough: Northern Harrier, White-tailed Kite were finally found, as well as Sora. On the lake we spotted Surf Scoter and Eared Grebe. We cleaned up on our Shorebirds here with the huge gathering on the mudflats. Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers, Western Sandpiper, Dunlin, Marbled Godwit and Long-billed Curlew were all added. Bonus birds were two Lesser Yellowlegs on Adobe Creek. Not found were any Black Skimmers, Blue-winged Teal or Common Moorhen. Bob Hirt gave us a tip on the continuing Hooded Mergansers at Heavens Gate Cemetary.

Heavens Gate Cemetary: Two female Hooded Mergansers and a female Common Goldeneye.

Stevens Creek Reservoir Boat Ramp: A pair of California Thrashers, exactly as promised by the Wild ones!

Stevens Creek Reservoir Picnic Area: From the overlook we found three Spotted Sandpipers, and more Wood Ducks. No Common Mergansers or Osprey.

Stevens Creek Canyon Road (third bridge): A pair of American Dippers displaying, singing and exchanging food gifts. It was getting darker now...

McClellan Ranch: Our last ditch effort at Red-shouldered Hawk. Nope... Time for dinner.

The final count was 148 species. Thank you everyone! Our many donors who contributed so generously to the effort, and our intrepid birding team helped make it another huge success. Thank you also to the Vairied Twitchers, Wild Women Birders, and Mr. Rock Wren himself (Bob Hirt) for help along the way, and from everyone who provided valuable information in the weeks preceeding our big day. It was an exhausting, fulfilling wonderful day!

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
Mallard
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
Green-winged Teal
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Eared Grebe
Western Grebe
Clark's Grebe
American White Pelican
Double-creseted Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night Heron
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
American Kestrel
Sora
American Coot
Black-belllied Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Willet
Spotted Sandpiper
Long-billed Curlew
Marbled Godwit
Western Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
Dunlin
Long-billed Dowitcher
Bonaparte's Gull
Ring-billed Gull
California Gull
Herring Gull
Thayer's Gull
Western Gull
Glaucous-winged Gull
Glaucous Gull
Caspian Tern
Forster's Tern
Rock Pigeon
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Eurasian Collared Dove
Barn Owl
Western Screech Owl
Burrowing Owl
White-throated Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Selasphorus species
Belted Kingfishere
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Cassin's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Rock Wren
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Marsh Wren
American Dipper
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Western Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Varied Thrush
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
California Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler (both "Myrtle" and "Audubon's")
Townsend's Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Black-headed Grosbeak
Lazuli Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Hooded Oriole
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow







Gilroy Hot Springs 04-11-09

Bird activity was much slower than anticipated, probably because of the cool overcast conditions and wind. We did have a few birds that stood out however, and two season firsts.

Only one Western Tanager and one Bullock's Oriole were detected the first half of the day, and those were simply heard from the Hunting Hollow parking lot. From there, we strolled along the road in the direction of the bridge at the far end of the road. There were NO Swallows along the creek, and it was generally quiet, which surprised us, but we did find at least 2 pair of Wood Duck. 4 Black-headed Grosbeak, two Warbling Vireos and a pair of Cassin's Vireo (FOS) were all located in the same sunlit slope about 300 yards upstreamfrom the Hunting Hollow parking lot of Henry Coe State Park. House Wrens were impossible to miss, but Bullock's Oriole was not seen until the second half of our day. Several Pacific-slope Flycatcher were seen and many heard, one Hammond's Flycatcher was found in the conifers just beyond the grassy hillside along GHS Road. This bird had was significantly grayer than nearby PSFLs, large-headed, narrow-billed with long primary projection and wing tips that extended beyond the base of the tail. It's eye ring was not as wide, nor was it as pointed behind the eye. Warbling Vireos were abundant, as were Orange-crowned Warblers which were everywhere of course, but surprisingly difficult to get good looks at. A single Ruby-crowned Kinglet was seen near the bridge at the end of GHS Road, and our best bird of the day, a Nashville Warbler (FOS) was heard chipping in the willows just upstream from the bridge. A moment later it popped into view and posed briefly before moving into the top of the trees over the trail. It foraged there for a moment before moving out of view uphill. Overhead we had two adult Golden Eagle, a Red-tailed Hawk and two Red-shouldered Hawks as well as a Cooper's Hawk.



Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller

After an early lunch, we caravanned along Canada Road to the junction with Jamieson Road where activity was significantly higher. The area is fully green now, and stunningly beautiful! Turning left onto Jamieson we paused at the riparian section to admire two pairs of squabbling Western Kingbird. Also present here were glorious Yellow-rumped Warblers in full breeding plumage, Tree, Violet-green and Northern Rough-winged Swallows. Also present were Bullock's Oriole, White-breasted Nuthatch, Nuttall's Woodpecker and Orange-crowned Warble. Continuing along the road toward the dead end, we found adult Wild Turkey, Great Blue Heron, Golden Eagle, Western Bluebird, Lark Sparrow, and Yellow-billed Magpie. Before leaving the area we added Sharp-shinned Hawk to the list as one flew over the meadow and directly overhead.



Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller


Photo: Brooke Miller

Non-avian species of the day was a Bobcat that crossed in front of our car as we drove slowly on Jamieson. It then moved uphill and stretched out on a shaded rock while our camera team clicked away. What a gorgeous animal!

(Note to self: Check to make sure the iPod is OFF before exciting everyone about a Yellow-breasted Chat...)

Mallard
Wood Duck
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
White-tailed Kite
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Golden Eagle
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Eurasian Collared Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Hammond's Flycatcher
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Western Kingbird
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
Yellow-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Western Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Cassin's Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Beam-eating Warbler
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Lark Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Red-winged Blackbird
Brewer's Blackbird
Bullock's Oriole
Purple Finch
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch




Alum Rock Park 04-04-09

Today lived up to all expectations we had about starting the term with healthy list of newly arrived spring breeding species! The weather was clear and warm, and by the time we arrived at the Rustic Lands parking area of the park, we could hear the chattering calls of Bullock's Orioles overhead. Upon closer listening, one of the calls sounded distinctly different and soon we discovered that Hooded Oriole was also present in the tall eucalyptus trees above us. House Wrens were positively un-missabe, as were Orange-crowned Warblers which were singing all around our group, both uphill and down from the lot. One by one we began to log the spring migrants we had hoped for.

We climbed a short distance up the north side of the canyon toward the radio towers, seeing two lingering Golden-crowned Sparrows and Bewick's Wren, but found little new in that drier habitat--certainly not the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher we had hoped for. Across the valley however, we saw a male Wild Turkey, or big Tom, posturing before a group of smaller females. Some of us were lucky enough to get fleeting looks at a male Black-headed Grosbeak that came and went too quickly.

Returning to the lot, we moved across the pedestrian bridge leading over the creek and continued to hear the Black-headed Grosbeak that we first detected from the hill. With effort, we finally got everyone on the bird which was a season first for the group. From this area we also became aware of how much the Yellow-rumped Warblers have changed in the past few weeks. Each adult showed striking black patterning on the upper breast and rich dark blue-gray upperparts. Quite a change from the winter drabs we usually see.

We continued through the shaded picnic area toward the stone bridge that leads over the road. The rocks above us had several Northern Rough-winged Swallows and a Violet-green Swallow circling around it. We also found a pair of Rufous-crowned Sparrows moving between bushes and occasionally perching in the open for us to admire. Just beyond the overpass we stopped to search for a signing Warbling Vireo in the oaks just above the road. We eventually found it along with a Hutton's Vireo and a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, as well as several Townsend's and Black-throated Gray Warbler. It's so nice when the bird behaves as the field guide says it is supposed to... dry oak hillside, just like the books say. Never mind that the Black-throated was actually foraging in a pine. On our way back to the Rustic Lands we stopped again to see the Rufous-crowned Sparrows, and found a Hermit Thrush lurking in the thick underbrush.


Photo: Rob Pavey

We relocated the cars to the top lot and strolled up to sycamore grove. Along the way we got much better looks at Northern Rough-winged Swallows, and a pair of Band-tailed Pigeons. Things were beginning to slow down considerably, except for the constant singing of House Wrens and Orange-crowned Warblers, and everyone was getting hungry. A short distance farther we explored the many cavities in the sycamore trees. It was beginning to by my belief that we were destined never to find the mythical Western Screech Owl that has been reported in various spots in the park for the past few years. Year after year, we have searched and failed. Today, however, we succeeded. The small gray Owl was sitting peacefully in plain sight, eyes closed, stock still and quite unconcerned with our excited little group. Definitely the bird of the day!


Photo: Rob Pavey

A bit farther we crossed another bridge and found an Empidonax species that struck us all as distinctly different from the several Pacific-slopes we had seen earlier. Grayish plumaged, short tailed, big headed, short-billed and with noticeably longer primary projection, my first thought was this could be a Hammond's Flycatcher. A confusing amount of dull flesh-tone on the uniformly dark toned lower mandible however, and our own difficulty at judging the actual width of the bill ensured that the standard Empidonax debate would take place. All books were open, all glasses and scopes were trained on the bird and while we did not necessarily arrive at a firm identification, we disassembled that bird pretty thoroughly. Perched in pieces on the branch of a conifer, we left our puzzle to carry on doing whatever it was doing before we found it. Now it just has to put itself back together...


Photo: Rob Pavey

After a very pleasant lunch by the interpretive center we continued birding the crowded picnic area. (A side note to the staff at Alum Rock: Red-tailed Hawk is a large Buteo, not a demure insect-eating Falcon. It's best to check those kinds of facts before having a expensive outdoor sign made right in front of the children's museum...) Anyway, the hoped-for Brown Creeper, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers did not appear, but we did find an Oak Titmouse nest, complete with impatient adult waiting for us to move on. Another Hermit Thrush was also doing its best not to be found. It will be migrating soon, so we were lucky I think.


Photo: Rob Pavey

The last thing we did was climb the hillside trail from the top lot. In years past we have found Rufous-crowned Sparrows here, but today we decided to put our efforts toward other birds. We found several Selasphorus Hummingbirds here, some with dense green backs, others without... So most likely at least one was a Rufous while most appeared to be Allen's. A lone Lincoln's Sparrow was briefly seen, working its way uphill, which not surprisingly is north. Later we found several Violet-green Swallows among the Rough-wings. Sheila bumped into us on her way down hill and said she had seen two Western Kingbirds at the summit and perhaps a Golden Eagle. We eventually turned around, choosing not to make the same hike she had, and encountered a male Western Tanager. (I missed that bird, but our car stopped just outside the park along Penetencia and found a female foraging in a residential area, so I guess I feel better.)


Photo: Rob Pavey


Photo: Rob Pavey

So that was our day. We missed a few species, but nothing we won't have another chance at later this term. It's interesting to note how few non-Passerines we logged, and how many of the birds we did see have arrived in the area in just the last few days. Thank you everyone for letting me freak out about the Owl. I've been waiting for that one on a class field trip for quite some time.


Mallard
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Western Screech Owl
Anna's Hummingbird
Selasphorus species (most apparent Allen's, at least one possible Rufous)
Elegant Trogon
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Hammond's Flycatcher (early results to third party photo survey confirm)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
California Thrasher
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Western Tanager
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Black-headed Grosbeak
Hooded Oriole
Bullock's Oriole
House Finch
Lessr Goldfinch